Google Patents Directed Energy Nanoparticle Wearable Device

Science & Tech

(Truthstream Media) For the record, Google has recently patented a wearable “nanoparticle phoresis” device with the World Intellectual Property Organization. The official patent was published just a few weeks ago.

The device is described in the patent as follows:

Functionalized particles in the blood are able to selectively bind to targets in the blood that have adverse health effects. The binding of the particles to the targets allows the targets to be selectively modified or destroyed by energy from outside the body such that the adverse health effects are reduced or eliminated. The energy is generated by a wearable device which is able to direct the energy into the subsurface vasculature of the wearer of the wearable device. Further, one or more of the functionalized particles may be magnetic, allowing a magnetic field generated by the wearable device and directed into the subsurface vasculature to concentrate the bound targets in a lumen of the subsurface vasculature proximate to the wearable device.

Brings a whole new meaning to the clip of Google CEO and Bilderberger Eric Schmidt (seen in the video below) chortling over the fact that Google likes to step right up to the creepy line and not cross it when he told The Atlantic that, ” I would argue that implanting things in your brain is beyond the creepy line. At least for the moment until the technology gets better.”

That was back in 2010.

Skip ahead a few years, and now the company will just offer wearables that generate and release directed energy into the body which target functionalized nanoparticles in the blood that can be “selectively modified or destroyed” by the wearable.

Once you are inside the body, the creepy line has definitely been crossed. Do we really want our modern-day version of Skynet shooting directed energy into our bodies that target nanoparticles in our blood?

And what if that energy has other effects on the electromagnetic biofields already surrounding our bodies? What if someone hacks the wearable?

Of course the device is described for use only against targets that have adverse health effects, but as we all know, technology is inherently neutral.

It’s a sad statement on reality that instead of high tech cancer cures, the film Transcendence, where Johnny Depp’s computerized character releases controlled nanoparticles that turn a town full of people into easily controllable, mindless robots, comes immediately to mind.

Is that going too far? Maybe…

But anything that can be used for good can also be harnessed for bad.

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